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Posts tagged ‘decision-making’

How to Tap Into Your Intuition For Decision Making

How to Tap Into Your Intuition For Decision Making

We make decisions every day. Having to make decisions can add to our stress. Some decisions are inconsequential, like what to eat at a restaurant. Choosing one meal versus another makes little difference to your life. You will nourish your body one way or the other and what you ate will soon be forgotten unless the meal was particularly good or really bad.

On the other hand, where to go on a vacation can be more memorable. If you like sunny weather and the beach, it behooves you to check out your destination, so you don’t end up going there during their rainy season or you are miles and miles away from the nearest beach.

Then there are decisions that have more impact: choosing a career, whom to marry, where to live, whom to hire to fill a particular job. These decisions have long ranging implications. Sometimes these decisions are easy; other times there are unclear choices. In those situations it would be nice to have some additional insight. If we felt comfortable to listen to our gut instinct that would be wonderful. But that instinct needs to be developed so that we can feel comfortable depending on it for our small and big decisions in life.

So how do we develop that confidence in our gut instinct or intuition?

Listen to your intuition on small things. Once I met a person for lunch, who was very comfortable with her intuition. We were at a restaurant she had never been to, yet she knew almost instantly what she wanted to eat. She explained her process as follows. On the drive to the restaurant she “checked in” with herself: how hungry was she; did she want something light or a heavier meal; salad or meat, what kind of meat; what would satisfy her hunger. Once she got to the restaurant she had an idea of what she was looking for. She merely turned to the appropriate page on the menu and an entrée jumped out at her. She went with that choice. Her meal was delicious.

Here is another example. When I managed rental properties, I used the Silva Mind Control technique of “going to level”. I would get to the rental property a little early. In the car I put myself in a relaxed state and in that state in my mind I pretended to meet the person who was interested in renting the property. In that relaxed state I got a 6th sense whether the person was a good fit and whether the person would end up being a good tenant. Many times this 6th sense proved to be correct. On the other hand I’ve had a gut feel that I should not rent to someone and if I went against my intuition those times turned out to be costly mistakes.

Next Step:

One way to gain confidence in your intuition is to keep an ‘intuition journal’. When you have an intuition about something or someone, write it down, whether you act on it or not. Also note if there are physical symptoms that went along with your intuition, such as a vision or a physical discomfort. Simply observe whether you were correct. As you recognize your intuition and see that it is leading you in the right direction, your confidence will grow and so will your intuitive power.

Contact me:

To determine if coaching can help you achieve your goals, schedule a free coaching consultation. Call Edith at 847.913.3900.

Decisions, decisions – what can you do?

Decisions, decisions – What can you do?

We are all faced with 100s of decisions every day. How easily we decide and move on may make all the difference between a “smooth” day and one with anguish. The more Decision-Making-Frameworks we have, the better our day tends to go.

Take the mail for example: Mail carrier delivers mail. You bring it into your home. How do you deal with it? Are there things you can immediately

  • Recycle
  • Shred
  • Things to follow up later that you decide right now when and how they will be taken care of
    • Bills to pay on a certain date
    • Letters to answer and time scheduled on your calendar to write
    • Magazines to read and when and where you will read them

Do you have anything left over that you are undecided about? That may become clutter. Soooo, one of my definitions of clutter is “deferred decisions”.

So, how do we create Decision-Making-Frameworks?

Story: Hey Ref!!

I am a soccer referee. You won’t find me on national television reffing a championship game, but you might find me on a pint sized soccer field. So? What does that have to do with Decision-Making-Frameworks?

The job of a referee is to make decisions – lots of decisions – throughout the entire game. You cannot delay a decision until tomorrow or even think about it for a few minutes. So you have to have a Decision-Making-Framework. It looks something like this:

  1. Is there a situation that requires a decision to be made by the referee?
  2. Make a decision in accordance with the “laws of the game”. Easy! Easy? That’s where the trouble starts. There are only 17 laws of the game. The laws are modifiable by each league and vary based on age. The level of enforcement or leniency may change by age. In the end each referee develops their personal style of refereeing within those laws. Consistency and neutrality is key.
  3. There is no pause or instant replay on a live game. Either the referee catches what just happened anywhere on the field or she didn’t. Meanwhile she runs back and forth, trying to anticipate and be in the best position to see what happens.
  4. When the ball goes out of play, everyone expects the referee to instantly decide how to restart the game. And of course there is a biased audience. Invariably there is someone who is vocal or even hostile if they believe the referee has made a mistake against their team.

Conclusion: as a referee you are in front of a potentially hostile audience who is watching your every move and lets you know if they disagree with your decisions. You are expected to see everything, and make instant decisions that are correct – every time.

Next time you watch a sporting event – please have mercy for the referee. They are human.

Call to Action and Why This Matters:

Become aware of your conscious and unconscious beliefs that influence your decision-making.

What if you believe that “knowledge is power”?

Back to our mail example. There may be interesting reading material, an offer to buy some educational material, an offer for something that might be of interest. Your belief may interfere with your ability to decide to let go of a piece of paper and cause your reading piles to get bigger and bigger.

What are some beliefs that may interfere with healthy decision-making:

  • Knowledge is Power (growing reading piles)
  • Waste not, want not (keeping things you no longer need)
  • Money is the root of all evil (trouble with saving money)
  • Expecting things to be perfect (constantly finding fault)
  • Things “should” be this way or that way (frustrated with others)
  • … Insert yours here

You may have conflicting beliefs that keep you stuck. Often limited time or money is seen as the culprit, when in fact decision-making and priority management might take care of some of the conflicts.

Become conscious about your priorities and values, then value-based decisions become easier with practice and consistency. These then form our Decision-Making-Frameworks.

Taking it Farther:

Create your own Decision-Making-Frameworks. You may start by seeing what you do now. Create a flowchart of your decision making process like this example.

DecisionFLowchart

Once you see what you do now, you can see where you get stuck. That’s where you may have beliefs or conflicts that interfere with your decisiveness. As you gain clarity, you will have more things you can decide easily. Discovering your beliefs and conflicts may require help.

Contact me:

Want more help? I’m here for you. Tired of holding yourself back? Get relief! Call to get yourself into coaching and get where you want to go faster. Have questions? Call to get answers. Edith at 847.913.3900

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